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~ Leonardo da Vinci (*1452;†1519) “Quod est inferius, est sicut quod est superius. As above, so below.” ~ Hermes Trismegistus (Tabula Smaragdina); “How can the multiplicity of life delude the one who sees its unity?” ~ Katha Upaniṣhad
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Slide 1
NHST: Type 1 error (α) inflation
NHST: Type 1 error (α) inflation
Decentralised network systems of trust: Blockchain technology for scientific research
Decentralised network systems of trust: Blockchain technology for scientific research
Quantum Interaction (Conference, 2015, Switzerland, Filzbach)
The neurochemistry of altruism
The neurochemistry of altruism
Kapālabhātī
Kapālabhātī
Plato’s Allegory of the Cave (English version)
Plato’s Allegory of the Cave (English version)
The p-value ritual
The p-value ritual
NHST: Online Survey
NHST: Online Survey
The vertical representation of affect: Mood effects in visual search
The vertical representation of affect: Mood effects in visual search
Aldous Huxley: The ultimate Revolution (Berkeley, 1962)
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NHST: Type 1 error (α) inflation
NHST: Type 1 error (α) inflation
Decentralised network systems of trust: Blockchain technology for scientific research
Decentralised network systems of trust: Blockchain technology for scientific research
Quantum Interaction (Conference, 2015, Switzerland, Filzbach)
Quantum Interaction (Conference, 2015, Switzerland, Filzbach)
The neurochemistry of altruism
The neurochemistry of altruism
Kapālabhātī
Kapālabhātī
Plato’s Allegory of the Cave (English version)
Plato’s Allegory of the Cave (English version)
The p-value ritual
The p-value ritual
NHST: Online Survey
NHST: Online Survey
The vertical representation of affect: Mood effects in visual search
The vertical representation of affect: Mood effects in visual search
Aldous Huxley: The ultimate Revolution (Berkeley, 1962)
Aldous Huxley: The ultimate Revolution (Berkeley, 1962)
NHST: Type 1 error (α) inflation

Definition of Type I error:
Probability of rejecting null hypothesis when it is TRUE.

Definition of Type II error:
Probability of not rejecting null hypothesis when it is False.

Imagine tests on 1000 hypotheses 100 of which are true.

The tests have a false positive rate of 5%. That means they produce 45 false positives (5% of 900). They have a power of .8, so they can confirm only 80 of the true hypotheses, producing 20 negatives.

Not knowing what is false and what is not the researcher sees 125 hypotheses as true, 45 of which are not. The negative results are much more reliable but less likely to be published.

A parable concerning editorial policies

There's this desert prison, see, with an old prisoner, resigned to his life, and a young one (...)

NHST: Type 1 error (α) inflation
Decentralised network systems of trust: Blockchain technology for scientific research

An interesting and innovative proposal is to use blockchain technologies (usually associated with digital crypto currencies like, for instance, Bitcoin or Ethereum) to counteract the replication crisis, to validate empirical findings, and to improve and optimize the scientific procedure on a large scale (Bartling & Fecher, 2016). The authors suggest that “Blockchain could strengthen science's verification process, helping to make more research results reproducible, true, and useful” (Bartling & Fecher, 2016, p. 1). Even though this proposal might seem unrealistic or overstated to those unfamiliar with blockchain technologies, we think that this is indeed an excellent innovative and creative proposal because blockchain technologies can be used in all situations which require (...)

Decentralised network systems of trust: Blockchain technology for scientific research
The neurochemistry of altruism

A cognitive neuroscience perspective on the interpersonal dimension of psilocybin
Abstract
Psilocybin (O-phosphoryl-4-hydroxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine) is an indole alkaloid  which is present in more than 150 fungi species, some of which are endemic to the UK (e.g., ). Its molecular structure closely resembles serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT). In humans, psilocybin is rapidly dephosphorylated to psilocin (4-N,N-dimethyltryptamine) which functions as a non-selective partial 5-HT receptor agonist (it shows particularly high binding affinity for the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor subtypes; Nichols, 2004). A landmark study conducted at Johns Hopkins University by MacLean, Johnson & Griffiths (2011) experimentally demonstrated that a single high-dose of psilocybin can induce long-lasting (...)

The neurochemistry of altruism
Kapālabhātī

Kapālabhātī is a yogic prāṇāyāma technique. From an etymological perspective, the word kapalabhati is a composite lexeme composed of two Sanskrit words: "kapal" meaning 'skull', and "bhati" meaning 'shining, illuminating'. (...)

Kapālabhātī
Plato’s Allegory of the Cave (English version)

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Plato’s Allegory of the Cave (English version)
The p-value ritual

The p-value and its implicit symbolism

The Aristotelian conditional syllogistic logic behind the Fisherian p-value is widely misunderstood which leads to fallacious logical inferences. The p-value resembles a Kantian paralogism, i.e., it appears objective and logically valid even though it is not. The p-value is an irrational social ritual (cf. Gigerenzer, 2004). Social conformity, obedience to authority, groupthink, and other aspects of Social Identity Theory (SIT) play an important role in this context.

Given the well-documented paralogisms associated with classical Fisherian null hypothesis significance testing (cf. Cohen, 1994) I advocate alternative inferential research methods. For the statistical analyses of the experimental data I collected during my PhD I utilised Bayesian (...)

The p-value ritual
NHST: Online Survey

 

Suppose you have a treatment which you suspect may alter performance on a certain task. You compare the means of your control and experimental group (say 20 subjects in each sample). Further, suppose you use a simple independent means t test and your result is (t = 2.7, d.f. 18, p = 0.01).
Please mark each of the statements below as "True" or "False".
Adapted from Oakes, M. (1986). Statistical inference: A commentary for the social and behavioral sciences. New York: Wiley.

(...)

NHST: Online Survey
Aldous Huxley: The ultimate Revolution (Berkeley, 1962)

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